Older Cub Parts

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chzuck
Posts: 308
Joined: Tue Sep 07, 2010 2:51 pm
First and Last Name: Charlie Zuck
Location: Elizabethtown, PA

Older Cub Parts

Post by chzuck »

I recently learned just how expensive parts for the older Cubs have become. $29 for a rear cover gasket and over $30 for the stud for the Ross steering box. Fortunately I have a mini-lathe and was able to repair the stud and I found thick gasket material and made a pattern for future needs. Anyway these old Cubs are better than anything on the market today and one does not need to have much electrical or mechanical skills to maintain one. A lot of the new stuff is just not made to repair. Soon parts for these will only come from other Cubs and people with machine shop capabilities. Still worth keeping them running!
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Klapatta
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Re: Older Cub Parts

Post by Klapatta »

Charlie just a reminder, when turning back those cam follower studs it's important to remove the appropriate amount of material from the face of the stud otherwise it will force contact with the root of the thread rather than the pitch sides. 1/16" clearance is a good amount.

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chzuck
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Re: Older Cub Parts

Post by chzuck »

Right, I checked that after turning to make sure there was enough clearance. It is a wonder someone did not come up with something better to replace that stud. Maybe a harder material. I ordered some of those 1/16" thick Teflon washers for the front spindles to supposedly make the steering easier. I already have the thrust bearing installed on the steering box.
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SWilliams
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Re: Older Cub Parts

Post by SWilliams »

I thought about a hardened stud for the box but then realized that would likely wear the worm itself more than the stud. If there was more room in there you could make a stirrup with a bearing on the end to ride in the groove. I looked at a couple of cam followers as well but nothing off the shelf would take the abuse.
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DaveKamp
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Re: Older Cub Parts

Post by DaveKamp »

The tricky thing about Ross steering boxes, is that in normal use, the pin wears most at the angle it addresses the worm in the wheels CENTERED position, as THIS is where most of the steering motion occurs... maintaining a straight line.

Resurfacing the pin to make it round, and then grinding the nose slightly to provide root clearance DOES help, but it doesn't resolve the wear that occurs on the WORM surface in that same area. Many guys, after truing up the nose, will reinstall and set it so that there's no slop in the center position, only to have it bind greatly once a half-turn off centered, because the work groove isn't worn there.

The only 'real' solution, is to grind a new width to the worm, which very, very, very few guys will have access to appropriate machinery to do that. :cry:
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